Tron: Legacy Review

By: Bryan Montgomery
Rating: 8.5 out of 10

In 1984, Tron changed the perception of film. With new-age special effects and a storyline involving the technological revolution, Tron became a cult hit. Over twenty years later the Tron series continues with Tron: Legacy, a film that steps the ante up once again. With fantastic visuals, a good storyline and fine performances, Tron: Legacy is a good distraction at the cinemas.

Sam Flynn is the son of Kevin Flynn, the protagonist of the first film. Kevin disappeared, leaving Sam an orphan. A now grown up Sam soon finds himself on The Grid, the dangerous world Kevin created, with the chance to rescue his father.

Tron: Legacy was met with a huge amount of skeptisism when first announced. Fans were in an uproar, concerned that the magic of the original would be lost with this modern update. Truth be told, Tron: Legacy is a worthy successor to the original. The main draw of the film is easily the visuals. The film is breathtakingly beautiful to look at, especially the time spent on the grid. Neon colors are vibrant, and the special effects are cutting edge. The primary antagonist of the film, Clu, is a reproduction of Jeff Bridges’ face artificially reduced in age. There has been a lot of criticism towards how it has been a middle-road special effect that is not perfect, but in a way, it works perfectly in the film. Why would you want a real actor to play a computer? It is much more proper to have a computer-generated image play a computer-generated-image, I thought that it made sense and worked great.

Jeff Bridges headlines the cast as Flynn, but Garrett Hedlund stands his own as Sam. The real stand out of the cast is Olivia Wilde as Quorra, a program that helps Kevin Flynn throughout the film. Wilde plays Quorra so well that you forget she is a program. By the time that the action really picks up, you don’t see Quorra as a program, but an actual person, something that was lacking with the characters in the original film that had the same personification.

The action of the film is frequent, fast and fun. Any fan of the original film will always talk about the disc game as well as the light cycle races, and both are back and ramped up for the sequel. As a fan of the original, I loved how Tron: Legacy took the light cycles and made them even cooler than they initially were. Add in a dogfight late in the film with virtual fighter jets, and I was completely sold.

The story is a falling point for the film. For anyone, even fans of the original, it can be difficult to follow, and comes off very preachy. In a world today where technology is a major component of our daily lives (I’ve gotten to the point where I do daily checks of the site through my Android phone), one should be able to accept technology, not condemn it. Tron: Legacy warns us of the pitfalls of being a superior technological society, but we already know that. Just one look at the individualistic nature of our generation says that we have grown self-sufficent through technology.

Overall, Tron: Legacy is worth a look. The 3D is a nice thing to have, but was not mandatory. It added little to the world of the grid, but still helped towards the overall feel of the movie. I would highly advise seeing this in the theater. The movie deserves to be seen on the big screen. The action is great, the acting is good, the plot is okay, but it’s all about the visuals. Easily the most beautiful film since Avatar, Tron: Legacy is a blast that is definitely worth a shot to see.

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